Pampa veterans, community remembers those who served on D-Day

Pampa veterans, community remembers those who served on D-Day

PAMPA, Texas (KFDA) - Members of VFW Post 1657 in Pampa and members of the community came together to remember those who died on that pivotal day in World War II.

Some veterans who served in Normandy on D-Day once stood beside the members of the Post.

“All of them have passed on,” said Commander of VFW Post 1657 Danny Martin. “You see some of them today are 97, 100-years-old, 105.”

The ceremony honored those veterans who fought for our freedom.

Members of VFW Post 1657 in Pampa and members of the community came together to remember those who died on that pivotal day in World War II. (Source: KFDA)
Members of VFW Post 1657 in Pampa and members of the community came together to remember those who died on that pivotal day in World War II. (Source: KFDA) (Source: KFDA)

As a combat veteran himself, Martin said winning that freedom couldn’t have been easy.

“For those guys to wade in the water knowing that they might not go another step, had to be hard,” he said.

A D-Day display is up at Freedom Museum USA in Pampa.

“Those young men were anywhere from 17 to 21. And in the first 30 minutes, over 30-percent of them died," said Secretary and Special Exhibits Coordinator at the museum Della Moyer. "It was to prevent someone else from stealing freedom from people.”

It shows service members from the Panhandle region who all had a part to play in the operation.

Members of VFW Post 1657 in Pampa and members of the community came together to remember those who died on that pivotal day in World War II. (Source: KFDA)
Members of VFW Post 1657 in Pampa and members of the community came together to remember those who died on that pivotal day in World War II. (Source: KFDA) (Source: KFDA)

“We have history, we have several other men from this area that served either on D-Day itself, they went in with the initial advancement, or they came, it’s called D-Plus one, Plus Two, within the next day or two to do whatever was asked of them," said Moyer.

Moyer said the display preserves the firsthand memories of the young veterans who are just some of the many who gave their lives so we could be free today.

“These guys actually sat down and told me their stories or their children did, or they provided me with letters, because some of them had already passed. It’s remarkable to visit with a veteran or the child of a veteran and hear firsthand experiences and that’s what we want our children to know about," she said. "That’s why we put these displays in the museum is to let the children, the students learn what it was really like, not what the history book says, but the true stories of the men who were actually there.”

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