Dumas Residents Use Sirens for Warning - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Dumas Residents Use Sirens for Warning

Dumas Resident Manda Randolph Dumas Resident Manda Randolph
Moore County Emergency Management Coordinator Tommy Brooks Moore County Emergency Management Coordinator Tommy Brooks

The last line of safety during severe weather should be the city's sirens.

When severe weather hits, residents say they want to be warned properly, but sometimes what people want is not how the city operates.

Many resident's think the sirens should be a warning that severe weather is in the area with time to seek shelter.

City officials say the sirens are a sign that a tornado is very close and it's time to already be in a safe place.

"At one point all you could hear was the air conditioners. that's how quiet it was around here," said Manda Randolph, a Dumas resident.

Manda Randolph expected to hear tornado sirens when she saw a severe storm coming toward her.

But the city of Dumas regulates those sirens.

"In Dumas we have 17 outdoor sirens. Our procedure is the sirens go off within 6 miles of the city limits," said Moore County Emergency Management Coordinator Tommy Brooks.

Randolph and her neighbors say they never heard a single one of the 17 sirens.

"It just scared me because they didn't have any warning whatsoever," Randolph said.

The city's emergency coordinator says the siren's aren't supposed to be a first alert.

And that you need to do more to keep yourself safe.

"Monitor the conditions, listen to the radio, watch the TV's. The sirens are there to warn you but when the sirens go off it's not time to go across town. It's time to shut the cellar door," Brooks said.

Dumas wants to add more sirens to the city system, but Brooks reiterated they are a last precaution for people outside.

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