Premature Babies A Problem in Texas Panhandle - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Premature Babies A Problem in Texas Panhandle

Abigail TeBeest now weights six pounds but when she was born she weighed 2lbs., 13 ounces. Abigail TeBeest now weights six pounds but when she was born she weighed 2lbs., 13 ounces.
Jason TeBeest Jason TeBeest
Pediatrician Meganne Walsh Pediatrician Meganne Walsh
Nurse Practitioner Phillip Platt Nurse Practitioner Phillip Platt

If you are planning to have a baby the risks of it being born premature are greater here in the texas panhandle than the national average.

The local chapter of the March of Dimes says one in six babies is at risk of being born premature compared to one in eight nationwide.

Local pediatrician Meganne Walsh says premature babies is a big problem in the Panhandle.

But she says her biggest conern is that there are no answers.

And I wish we knew the answers. One of the things that's so concerning about premature births is we don't know alot about it. We know some of the causes of prematurity but there's alot about prematurity causes that we don't know.

The TeBeest family is one of many families giving birth to premature babies.

Jason TeBeest of Spearman Texas says, You always worry about your finances and it's kind of put our marriage at a different time and cricumstance. At first I was scared but then I thought of the many ways they can take care of these little kids now."

Abigail TeBeest now weights six pounds but when she was born she weighed 2lbs., 13 ounces.

A local nurse practitioner says there is never enough room in the N.I.C.U

Phillip Platt says,"Each year the numbers keep increasing and this year we're running average numbers of what the capacity of our unit its.

And even after the babies leave the N.I.C.U.  they still face a long road ahead of them.

"Learning problems, growing problems, breathing problems are kind of the things that we see."

Walsh says while there are no answers to why we are seeing more premature babies in the panhandle but with continuing research she says she hopes the problem is solved in her lifetime.

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