Popular Home Remedies Could Cause Harm - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Popular Home Remedies Could Cause Harm

Popular home remedies passed down from generation to generation could contain harmful ingredients. 
  
Roxanne Rodriguez tells a young mother what to use for her newborns colic. A home remedy she says has been used for many generation in her family.

"Great grandmother, grandmother, mothers, and now us the new generations still use the home remedies."
  
But recently some ingredients in these home remedies have come under fire because some contain lead.

"These can be extremely toxic potentially fatal if used in a large amount in an acute injection or at one time or in a small amount chronically overtime used several different times." said Ronica Farrar, Educator at the Panhandle Poison Control Center.
  
Farrar also says that's because many of these products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and recommends people don't use them. 

But Rodriguez says with the high cost of health insurance, some people don't have a choice.

"It's hard on a low income family as big as mine is to go to the doctor all the time if he's got colic or a toothaches. With a home remedy it works."

Local doctors and the Amarillo Public Health Department say they have not seen cases of lead poisoning popping up from these remedies. But Poison Control cautions if you don't know what's in it you may want to avoid it.

If you would like the ingredients investigated contact the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.

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