Hidden Home Hazards - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Hidden Home Hazards

"Where we keep our TV's it's very sturdy. So we don't have to worry about him being able to pull the TV off and if it's up higher falling down on him," says Yvonne Mercer "Where we keep our TV's it's very sturdy. So we don't have to worry about him being able to pull the TV off and if it's up higher falling down on him," says Yvonne Mercer
"Paying attention and looking at details because it doesn't take a lot of your time out, but it's something that can save a child," says Greg Cunningham, CPS "Paying attention and looking at details because it doesn't take a lot of your time out, but it's something that can save a child," says Greg Cunningham, CPS

A Texas child is dead after being struck by a falling TV. A danger that's more common than you think. It's also one of the Consumer Product Safety Commissions top five hidden home hazards.

Newschannel 10 spoke with local safety experts to find out how you can protect your child from hidden hazards in your home.

Television sets, book cases, dressers and desks can easily be tipped by a young child and cause major injury. Experts say it's usually because the child is trying to climb onto the item or they accidentally bump in to it or lean on it. There are also cases when TV's are placed on furniture that isn't sturdy enough to hold it.

Greg Cunningham at Child Protective Service offers this suggestion to parents.

"One of the easiest things to do that no one really thinks about, get down on your hands and knees look at what's there. See what a child can reach or what a child would find interesting. Then think how that could negatively impact a child and how that could injure them."

C.P.S.C. lists these other items as home dangers, magnets, window coverings, pool and spa drains, recalled products and of course tipped-over furniture.

They say window coverings strangling a child, recalled items, pools and spa drains causing a child to get sucked into the drain and drown and children choking on magnets.

Yvonne Mercer a new mother says she's knows that furniture can be a danger to her child.

"Where we keep our TV's it's very sturdy. So we don't have to worry about him being able to pull the TV off and if it's up higher falling down on him."

Cunningham adds "Paying attention and looking at details because it doesn't take a lot of your time out, but it's something that can save a child. If something happens to your child and it was preventable that would be so hard to live with."

Experts say the most important thing parents can do is to supervise their children at play.

 

Powered by Frankly