Mandatory Random Steroid Testing - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

05.29.07

Mandatory Random Steroid Testing

"I don't think it's much of an issue here in the Panhandle," says Mark Hand "I don't think it's much of an issue here in the Panhandle," says Mark Hand
Macenzie Holberg says, "it's probably a good idea to keep it open to everyone but I think it's very good for athletes because it's not fair for try outs." Macenzie Holberg says, "it's probably a good idea to keep it open to everyone but I think it's very good for athletes because it's not fair for try outs."
There's a few people I can think of that would be scared," says local athlete Cole Walker There's a few people I can think of that would be scared," says local athlete Cole Walker

Your high school athlete could randomly be picked to take a steroid test next fall, that's if Governor Rick Perry makes it law.

Although the Governor has not expressed any opposition to this bill, NewsChannel 10's Felicia Lafuente found parents and athletes who are torn on the issue.  "I don't think it's much of an issue here in the Panhandle, most of the kids are hard working, spend their time in the weight barn rely on themselves to get their strength," says area athlete Mark Hand.

Macenzie Holberg adds, "it probably be a good idea to keep it open to everyone but I think it's very good for athletes because it's not fair for try outs." From football and basketball players to those participating in tennis and track, all athletes in Texas public high schools would randomly be tested for steroids.

"If we knew ahead of time that if he chose to get involved in athletics and he might be tested that would be fine," says a local parent, Wanda Johnson. Coach Jim Hand adds, "Now they're going to test those who are trying to do the best thing for their town and school, put them on the spot which I don't think is an issue, I think it's putting a lot of pressure on them."

If athletes tested positive or refused to take a test, they could be suspended from playing. Three million dollars has been set aside for the program, making it the largest high school steroid testing program in the country. "There's a few people I can think of that would be scared," says local athlete Cole Walker.

"I think it might trigger people to stop because if they really enjoy the sport and what they are doing in athletics then maybe they'll quit so they can really make the team but I don't know, it'll be interesting to see what happens," says Holberg. If passed, coaches would have to complete a training program on the dangers of using steroids.

Governor Perry must also decide on several other bills. The Governor must decide on raising the marriage license fee from thirty to sixty dollars, whether to give pet owners whose dogs attack another person prison time and fines.

Also in the Governor's hands is a bill that would offer bible classes to high school students and a five dollar admission fee on strip club patrons to help sexual assault victims.

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