Tips for Better Dental Health - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Tips for Better Dental Health

  • To get a balanced diet, eat a variety of foods. Choose foods from each of the five major food groups:
    --breads, cereals and other grain products
    --fruits
    -- vegetables
    -- meat, poultry and fish
    -- milk, cheese and yogurt
  • Limit the number of snacks that you eat. Each time you eat food that contains sugars or starches, the teeth are attacked by acids for 20 minutes or more.
  • If you do snack, choose nutritious foods, such as cheese, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, or a piece of fruit.
  • Foods that are eaten as part of a meal cause less harm. More saliva is released during a meal, which helps wash foods from the mouth and helps lessen the effects of acids.
  • Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste that has the American Dental Association Seal of Acceptance.
  • Clean between your teeth daily with floss or interdental cleaners.
  • Visit your dentist regularly. Your dentist can help prevent problems from occurring and catch those that do occur while they are easy to treat.

    Copyright American Dental Association.  All rights reserved.

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