Law enforcement get schooled in animal cruelty - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Law enforcement get schooled in animal cruelty

Source: KFDA Source: KFDA
Source: KFDA Source: KFDA
Source: KFDA Source: KFDA
Source: KFDA Source: KFDA
Christy Fischer, Instructor of Law Enforcement Training Institute's NACIS Christy Fischer, Instructor of Law Enforcement Training Institute's NACIS

AMARILLO, TX (KFDA) - This week, Amarillo Animal Management and Welfare is hosting a course teaching law enforcement about animal cruelty cases. 

The National Animal Cruelty Investigations School (NACIS) is opening the course to police, animal control officers, prosecutors, and students.

The course is a level one course that focuses on topics such as report writing, interview and interrogation, animal law, and several other topics that will help law enforcement investigate such crimes. 

Christy Fischer, an Instructor of Law Enforcement Training Institute's NACIS, said the course mainly focuses on recognizing animal cruelty cases and related crimes.

Fischer feels this is important because state academies do not train law enforcement in animal cruelty. 

"It's actually unheard of nationwide for a law enforcement academy to hold specialized training on that," Fischer said. "Hopefully we're going to do a better job at getting the resources out to our law enforcement officers, to our animal control officers, our veterinarians, our prosecutors so that they're better able to recognize cruelty or neglect when it is occurring, and that they'll be better prepared to put together a case so hopefully the animals will get the justice they deserve." 

Because of the severity of recent animal abuse cases, Fischer said this course is a need in our area. 

"I think most people would really be surprised about how much neglect and criminal activity in regards to animals happens on a daily basis," Fischer said. "Some of it is more severe than others, obviously, but it's definitely a need in this area." 

Fischer hopes this course will help prosecute the suspects and show the community these cases will not be taken lightly. 

"By training [law enforcement] to really take these crimes seriously to be able to recognize evidence, to be able to build a solid case from start to finish so that prosecutions do occur, I really so hope that we're reinforcing to the public that we are going to take this things seriously," Fischer said. "We're no longer going to be a community that just willing to look past these things."

Similar courses are also open to the public. For information on classes and when they will be in the area again, visit the National Animal Cruelty Investigations School.

Copyright 2016 KFDA. All rights reserved.
 

Powered by Frankly