Double Mastectomy Doesn't Always Prevent Cancer from Coming Back - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Double Mastectomy Doesn't Always Prevent Cancer from Coming Back

Katie Green, Two-Time Breast Cancer Survivor Katie Green, Two-Time Breast Cancer Survivor

AMARILLO, TX - As a preventative measure, both women and men who are diagnosed with breast cancer in one breast often get both removed.

This is to reduce the chance of getting the cancer again.

But it is possible to get breast cancer even after a double mastectomy.

Local two-time breast cancer survivor Katie Green received a double mastectomy after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008.

She wasn't expecting to get cancer again 6 years later.

"I carry a mutated gene," said Green. "All my kids have been tested, my youngest daughter tested negative and my oldest daughter tested positive."

Local oncologist Dr. Srini Reddy said he doesn't recommend preventative mastectomies for people who don't carry the mutated gene like Green does.

"People think that removing the breast will reduce the risk," said Reddy. "But the problem when you do a mastectomy is you won’t be able to get 100 percent of the breast tissue. So what’s left is still susceptible to cancer."

Green has beat breast cancer again, and will be serving as the Honorary Chair for the annual Susan G Komen Race for the Cure in downtown Amarillo Saturday.

Anyone who wants to run in the race can register at Amarillo National Bank, where all the races will start at 8 and 9:15 a.m.

Day-of registration is $40, and money raised will go towards breast cancer research.

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