Racquetball tournament helps raise money - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Racquetball tournament helps raise money for Share the Road Texas

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Amarillo, TX -

After three days straight of racquetball, the Share the Road Texas Amarillo group is finally wrapping up their tournament.

The event which is presented by FirstBank Southwest and hosted by Gold's Gym raises funds to support the groups mission.

"The main mission I guess is to bring awareness and education to the community of Amarillo that there are people other then just cars on the highway to be shared as far as kids walking to school and people using bicycles and there just has to be an awareness," group president Garry Rich told us.

Over 70 people participated in the tournament, which organizers say they were pleased to see.

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