FDA Proposes New Regulations for Pet Food and Animal Feed Safety - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

FDA Proposes New Regulations for Pet Food and Animal Feed Safety

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The FDA is proposing stricter regulations on pet food and animal feed after many dogs and other animals have gotten sick, and even died, over the last few years. The proposed rule would be part of the "2011 FDA Food Safety Modernization Act".

The proposed rule would  have three parts. The first part would be to regulate the manufacturing, processing, packing and holding of animal food. The second part would be to establish good manufacturing practices for facilities who make the pet food. And lastly, the rule would better regulate animal food that was from outside of the United States.

In a statement FDA spokesperson Juli Ann Putnam said, "...The proposal is part of the Food Safety Modernization Act's larger effort to modernize the food safety system for the 21st century and focus public and private efforts on preventing food safety problems, rather than relying primarily on responding to problems after the fact."

We spoke to one Veterinarian who likes the new rule and believes it will be beneficial.

"I think it's a great idea, I think it's a long time coming, there have always been laws existing and in place, but these new regulations are going to give the FDA a little bit more I guess power if you will to oversee the manufacturing process and the packaging process," said Veterinarian Sarah Viera, DVM.

We also got this statement from Merrick Pet Food, which is based in Amarillo.

"Merrick shares the FDA's commitment to pet food quality and safety and recently reaffirmed our commitment by earning the Safe Quality Food (SQF) Level 3 certification. We believe being SQF Level 3 certified sets us up well for proposals outlined in (the) Food Safety Modernization Act and overall increases pet parents' confidence in our food and quality safety practices," said Pete Brace, Merrick spokesperson.

The proposed rule is currently open for public comment for 120 days before any more action is taken.