Clovis finishes poisoning prairie dogs at park - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Clovis finishes poisoning prairie dogs at park

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CLOVIS, N.M. (AP) - The city of Clovis has finished applying poison at a park in a bid to reduce the prairie dog population there.

The Portales News-Tribune reports that the last bit of poison was applied Friday at Ned Houk Park.

Earlier this month, city commissioners approved a plan to poison the prairie dogs after several landowners near the park complained to commissioners about the burrowing rodents.

Up to $25,000 was approved for an emergency budget transfer to purchase 250 containers of rodenticide to reduce the population of prairie dogs at park.

 

Information from: Portales News-Tribune, http://www.pntonline.com

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