US Supreme Court ruling on illegal immigration - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

US Supreme Court ruling on illegal immigration

The US Supreme Court upheld part of a ruling concerning illegal immigration policies while striking down other parts.

Arizona Police Officers will continue to have the right to ask for immigration papers, while enforcing other laws, if they're suspicious about the person's status. This is the only part of the state's illegal immigration law that was upheld today in the 5 to 3 ruling.

Catholic Family Services Immigration Counselor Al Muñiz says, "Congress is not doing their job. What is happening is the states are taking it in their own hands. And they are making laws that doesn't match with the federal law. That is why we are having problems like this one."

Congressman Mac Thornberry says, "I think the federal government needs to do its job. And it's unfortunate that the president recently announced he's not going to enforce part of the law. Because I think that makes it harder for congress and the president to sort through some of the difficult complicated issues related to immigration."

Here's what some area residents we spoke with had to say. Estephan Maldonado says, "I don't think they should do it. I think it's more of a racial thing. I think we're all here for the same reason, to make a living." Greg Harris says, "As long as you're here legally what does it really matter"

But experts say today's ruling will not affect much. Muñiz says, "What will happen is they just require they will ask for that (immigration papers), but they will not be able to arrest anybody for minor immigration things. Which means they will not be able to do anything."

Illegal immigrants still can apply for jobs and work, they won't be arrested without warrant even though probable cause may exist, and it's not a crime for them to fail to carry document papers.

Congressman Thornberry says the federal government needs to do its job, and enforce what comes through our borders as well as who's in our country.

Jessica Abuchaibe, NewsChannel 10.

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