Texas Medicaid changes - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Texas Medicaid changes

Amarillo, TX - If you are a Medicaid patient, your plan and provider could have changed without you even realizing it.

"I had tried to call to take him in for an appointment and they said that his provider had been switched and it was in Lubbock," Medicaid patient, Cali Pitts, said.

The last time she tried to take her son to the doctor, she ran into some problems. Her provider had changed. That is because of the new Medicaid Managed Care program in Texas. It is asking Medicaid patients to pick a new health care program and provider.

"The change occurred, effective March 1st," Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center managing director, Lisa Campell, said, "because the public provider went away and it was replaced by private providers."

When Pitts took her sick son to the doctor, she learned her provider had changed.

"So, they couldn't see him 'til I had got it switched and he was sick and so I was upset and I called," Pitts said.

"The most important thing you can do when you get the packet is pick a primary care provider," Campbell said. Pitts made a phone call and now things are okay.

"All they had to do was change it in the computer and then they faxed something letting them know they had the right provider," Pitts said, " then they were able to get them in that day."

Not making the change is a setback when you are in need of health care. Medicaid patients were notified about the change two months in advance. If you are a Medicaid patient who would like to change your primary care provider, you can call 1-800-964-2777.

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