Inside the Levi King Courtroom: Closing Arguments - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Inside the Levi King Courtroom: Closing Arguments

After a few rebuttal witnesses called by the prosecution early in the morning, the closing arguments began. The judge first instructed the jury that when making their decision on a final verdict, they need to take into account whether or not they believe, beyond a reasonable doubt, that Levi King will pose a future threat to society.

The prosecution began their closing arguments first. They went over all of the witnesses the defense put on the stand, questioning he validity of some, and using others to point out that the picture the defense painted of the "King House on the Hill" was not as bad as it appears. She then showed several photos of the Pampa crime scene. This was too much for many of the victim's family members to take, especially Robin Doan, the sole survivor of those attacks. She broke down in tears several times. DA Lynn Switzer also re-played the audio tape of the 911 phone call made by Robin Doan the morning King murdered her family. It was very emotional inside the courtroom during the audio tape, much like it was when it was played at the start of the trial.

The defense's closing arguments took about two hours as well. They began by saying the Pampa victims were the result of the "King House on the Hill." He said while there is no excuse and no defense for what King did, he pleaded with the jury for King's life. One of his attorneys then went on the quote the bible, specifically the part about being a good Samaritan. He went on to tell the jury that the decision they're about to make is as important as anything any of them has ever done and it's something that they will have to live with the rest of their lives. They drove home the point that if given life without parole, King would still suffer. They called prison a "cold and bleak" place, saying King would never again be a free man. He asked the jury for mercy.

Closing arguments ended around 6:15 Monday evening. The jury decided to call it a night and begin deliberation Tuesday morning.

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