Answers To Questions Over Man's Release, Suicide Weeks Later - KFDA - NewsChannel 10 / Amarillo News, Weather, Sports

Answers To Questions Over Man's Release, Suicide Weeks Later

Amarillo Police Sergeant Brent Barbee Amarillo Police Sergeant Brent Barbee
Randall County District Attorney James Farren Randall County District Attorney James Farren

A recent standoff has many in the area wondering why a man was allowed back into society after his arrest, only to kill himself two weeks later.

After a four hour standoff with police earlier this month, many figured Timothy Crumpton would face some charges.  But apparently it is not that simple.

On May 7, police say Crumpton went to his estranged wife's apartment with a rifle.  Four hours later, he surrendered to police, but was never charged.

Amarillo Police Sergeant Brent Barbee says, "they didn't establish that he had intent to threaten or harm someone based on the evidence that was gathered during the course of the investigation."

Randall County District Attorney James Farren agrees, saying "he just wasn't making any statements or gestures, he didn't point his weapon at anyone else, he didn't point it at officers. The only person he ever intended to harm, it was obvious, was himself."

Crumpton went back to the apartment on Monday and shot himself dead, which is what many believe he wanted to do the first time.

Sgt. Barbee says, "if we have reason to believe a person is a danger to themselves or other people because of their mental status, then the law requires they be evaluated by a mental health professional."

We tried to talk with mental health professionals at Northwest Texas Hospital and the Pavilion, but our several phone calls and messages were never returned.

But Farren says the standard mental evaluation period for a situation like this is, at most, 72 hours. 

But "after that, we have to jump through a lot of hoops and we have to have the cooperation, again, of some family members, some evidence. We can't just go to court and say gosh we'd like to lock some folks up at the pavilion for a while."

Farren says there was not enough evidence or cooperation to hold Crumpton after the 72 hours.

He says Crumpton had been considering suicide for months.

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